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Employees say they expect employers to invest in their well-being

In today's tight labor market, employees increasingly expect their employers to invest in their well-being. While most Chief Human Resources Officers (CHROs) support such investments, convincing the C-suite may be challenging. Employee-reported levels of well-being have stagnated, with many reporting similar or lower levels than six months ago, including engagement, mental health, and other aspects of well-being. To address this, CHROs can link well-being initiatives to C-suite priorities such as leadership development, culture reinforcement, and talent acquisition and retention. Despite increased demand for workplace well-being, many employees rate their company's support as average or poor, leading some to seek new job opportunities. However, workers who experience high well-being are more likely to prioritize work effectively, use creative problem-solving, and invest energy in tasks. Click here for article.

  • Current Landscape:

  • In a tight labor market, employees expect employers to invest in their well-being.

  • Most CHROs support well-being investments, but the C-suite may need convincing.

  • Employee-reported well-being levels have stagnated, with some reporting declines in engagement, mental health, and overall well-being.

  • Approach to the Problem:

  • CHROs can align well-being initiatives with C-suite priorities such as leadership development and talent retention.

  • Linking well-being to business strategy and culture is essential.

  • Employee Expectations:

  • Most U.S. and European employees believe employers are responsible for their well-being.

  • Workers, especially millennials and Generation Z, show increased interest in wellness benefits like sponsored gym memberships and mindfulness sessions.

  • Challenges:

  • Despite increased demand, over half of employees rate their company's well-being support as average or poor.

  • Some workers feel their employers don't care about their well-being, leading to job dissatisfaction and turnover.

  • Impact on Work Performance:

  • Only a third of people report thriving at work, with well-being driven by feelings of energy, belonging, and trust.

  • Workers with high well-being are more likely to prioritize work effectively and invest energy in tasks.

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